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In this seventh and final seminar of 2013-14, the research group 'Urban history' will discuss the interaction between cities, nation and empire in a case study on the transfer and appropriation of American planning ideals in the colonial context of the Phillipines.

Detail Summary
Date 1 July 2014
Time 15:00
Location
Room Bungehuis, room 101

Lecture by dr. Ian Morley (Hong Kong): Cities and Nationhood: American Imperialism, Civic Design, and the Philippines, 1898-1916 

The importation of American urban design practices into South East Asia during the early-twentieth century redefined the environmental structure of the region’s cities. Whilst it is acknowledged that the introduction of City Beautiful urbanism led to the endorsement of spatial arrangements dissimilar to what had previously existed, not much is currently known about, firstly, why urban designing became such a fundamental component of governance at that time and, secondly, what impact city designing had upon the expansion of local civilization and the construction of nationhood. Consequently, this talk seeks to explain the form and meaning of SE Asia’s first generation of City Beautiful projects, that is to say the urban planning schemes implemented between 1905 and 1916 as part of America’s colonial administration of the Philippines. 

About Ian Morley

Dr. Ian Morley is based in the Department of History at the Chinese University of Hong Kong. He has published in numerous journals on the design of built environments during the late-1800s and early-1900s. He is the Book Review Editor for Urban Morphology (the journal of the International Seminar on Urban Form), an editorial board member of Planning Perspectives, and a former council member of the International Planning History Society. He has been a Visiting Fellow at the University of Sydney and University College Dublin, and was a Visiting Scholar on the urbanism programme held by the Universidade Estudual de Maringá and Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais in Brazil.

Room Bungehuis, room 101